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Adult Ranking 2020



 
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States that are ranked 1-13 have lower prevalence of mental illness and higher rates of access to care for adults. States that are ranked 39-51 indicate that adults have higher prevalence of mental illness and lower rates of access to care.

The 7 measures that make up the Adult Ranking include:

  1. Adults with Any Mental Illness (AMI)
  2. Adults with Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year
  3. Adults with Serious Thoughts of Suicide
  4. Adults with AMI who are Uninsured
  5. Adults with AMI who Did Not Receive Treatment
  6. Adults with AMI Reporting Unmet Need
  7. Adults with Disability Who Could Not See a Doctor Due to Costs

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State
01 Georgia
02 Texas
03 West Virginia
04 New Jersey
05 North Carolina
06 Mississippi
07 Alabama
08 Delaware
09 Pennsylvania
10 Connecticut
11 Illinois
12 Vermont
13 Ohio
14 Nebraska
15 Rhode Island
16 California
17 Maine
18 Arizona
19 Wisconsin
20 West Virginia
21 North Carolina
22 New Mexico
23 Massachusetts
24 Florida
25 Alabama
26 North Dakota
27 New Hampshire
28 Tennessee
29 Mississippi
30 Texas
31 Missouri
32 Kentucky
33 Colorado
34 South Dakota
35 South Carolina
36 Arkansas
37 Indiana
38 Oklahoma
39 Montana
40 Georgia
41 District of Columbia
42 Virginia
43 Kansas
44 Alaska
45 Louisiana
46 Washington
47 Nevada
48 Wyoming
49 Idaho
50 Utah
51 Oregon

Adult Prevalence of Mental Illness - Adults with Any Mental Illness (AMI) 2020



 
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  • 18.57% of adults are experiencing a mental health illness, equivalent to 45 million Americans.
  • 4.38% are experiencing a severe mental health illness.
  • The state prevalence of adult mental illness ranges from 16.19% in New Jersey to 25.03% in Idaho.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 New Jersey 16.19 1,115,000
02 Hawaii 16.27 173,000
03 Texas 16.32 3,309,000
04 Illinois 16.76 1,627,000
05 Maryland 16.94 778,000
06 Florida 17.54 2,861,000
07 New York 17.61 2,713,000
08 South Dakota 17.70 113,000
09 New Mexico 17.73 276,000
10 Nebraska 17.88 252,000
11 Pennsylvania 17.98 1,786,000
12 North Carolina 18.02 1,387,000
13 Arizona 18.02 944,000
14 Georgia 18.07 1,385,000
15 California 18.18 5,419,000
16 Connecticut 18.18 506,000
17 Minnesota 18.21 765,000
18 North Dakota 18.30 103,000
19 Michigan 18.34 1,405,000
20 Wisconsin 18.54 822,000
21 South Carolina 18.56 704,000
22 Delaware 18.65 138,000
23 Virginia 18.78 1,195,000
24 Nevada 18.87 424,000
25 Maine 19.01 203,000
26 Iowa 19.02 450,000
27 Mississippi 19.04 420,000
28 Louisiana 19.11 663,000
29 New Hampshire 19.15 203,000
30 Tennessee 19.24 977,000
31 Rhode Island 19.59 164,000
32 Kansas 19.71 421,000
33 Montana 19.78 159,000
34 Vermont 19.84 99,000
35 Ohio 19.85 1,759,000
36 Colorado 19.86 838,000
37 Alabama 19.95 737,000
38 Oklahoma 20.02 578,000
39 Missouri 20.05 925,000
40 Wyoming 20.25 88,000
41 Alaska 20.32 107,000
42 Massachusetts 20.57 1,109,000
43 Arkansas 20.73 464,000
44 Indiana 20.90 1,041,000
45 District of Columbia 21.17 117,000
46 Kentucky 22.29 747,000
47 Washington 22.81 1,277,000
48 West Virginia 22.89 326,000
49 Utah 23.47 500,000
50 Oregon 23.59 757,000
51 Idaho 25.03 310,000
52 National 18.57 45,641,000

Adult with Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year 2020



 
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  • 7.68% of adults in America reported having a substance use disorder in the past year;
  • 2.72% an illicit drug use disorder in the past year;
  • 5.82% an alcohol use disorder in the past year.
  • The state prevalence of adults with substance use disorder in the past year ranges from 6.32% in Georgia to 11.55% in the District of Columbia.

Substance Use Disorder is defined as meeting criteria for illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse. Illicit Drug Use includes the misuse of prescription psychotherapeutics or the use of marijuana, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or methamphetamine. Misuse of prescription psychotherapeutics is defined as use in any way not directed by a doctor, including use without a prescription of one's own; use in greater amounts, more often, or longer than told; or use in any other way not directed by a doctor. Prescription psychotherapeutics do not include over-the-counter drugs.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 Georgia 6.32% 484000
02 Texas 6.44% 1307000
03 West Virginia 6.47% 92000
04 New Jersey 6.52% 449000
05 North Carolina 6.54% 504000
06 Mississippi 6.77% 149000
07 Alabama 6.86% 253000
08 Tennessee 6.94% 353000
09 Minnesota 6.97% 293000
10 Hawaii 7.03% 75000
11 Florida 7.16% 1166000
12 Utah 7.19% 153000
13 Pennsylvania 7.22% 717000
14 Kansas 7.24% 155000
15 Kentucky 7.47% 251000
16 Indiana 7.56% 377000
17 Missouri 7.66% 353000
18 Arkansas 7.72% 173000
19 Arizona 7.73% 405000
20 California 7.78% 2319000
21 Oklahoma 7.78% 225000
22 Virginia 7.78% 495000
23 South Carolina 7.86% 298000
24 Maryland 7.89% 362000
25 Michigan 7.93% 608000
26 New York 8.04% 1238000
27 Wyoming 8.05% 35000
28 Ohio 8.05% 713000
29 Nebraska 8.08% 114000
30 Idaho 8.18% 101000
31 New Mexico 8.22% 128000
32 Illinois 8.32% 808000
33 Nevada 8.32% 187000
34 Maine 8.36% 89000
35 Louisiana 8.46% 293000
36 Wisconsin 8.52% 378000
37 North Dakota 8.60% 49000
38 New Hampshire 8.69% 92000
39 Rhode Island 8.77% 73000
40 Connecticut 8.77% 244000
41 Washington 8.89% 497000
42 Delaware 8.93% 66000
43 Colorado 9.07% 383000
44 Iowa 9.20% 218000
45 Montana 9.23% 74000
46 Alaska 9.26% 49000
47 South Dakota 9.56% 61000
48 Oregon 9.76% 313000
49 Vermont 9.99% 50000
50 Massachusetts 10.13% 546000
51 District of Columbia 11.55% 64000
52 National 7.68% 18878000

Adults with Serious Thoughts of Suicide 2020



 
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  • The percentage of adults reporting serious thoughts of suicide is 4.19%.
  • The estimated number of adults with serious suicidal thoughts is over 10.3 million—an increase of nearly 450,000 people from last year’s data set.
  • The state prevalence of adults with serious thoughts of suicide range from New Jersey at 3.41% to Utah at 5.99%.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 New Jersey 3.41% 235000
02 Florida 3.49% 569000
03 New York 3.68% 568000
04 Texas 3.72% 754000
05 Illinois 3.87% 376000
06 Alabama 3.89% 144000
07 Michigan 3.99% 306000
08 Maine 3.99% 43000
09 Maryland 4.00% 184000
10 Mississippi 4.01% 88000
11 New Mexico 4.01% 63000
12 Arizona 4.02% 211000
13 Missouri 4.04% 186000
14 California 4.04% 1205000
15 Nebraska 4.05% 57000
16 Connecticut 4.05% 113000
17 Hawaii 4.08% 43000
18 Oklahoma 4.10% 118000
19 District of Columbia 4.11% 23000
20 South Carolina 4.11% 156000
21 Delaware 4.16% 31000
22 Virginia 4.20% 268000
23 Louisiana 4.25% 147000
24 Pennsylvania 4.28% 426000
25 Georgia 4.38% 336000
26 Wyoming 4.39% 19000
27 South Dakota 4.40% 28000
28 Tennessee 4.50% 228000
29 Minnesota 4.52% 190000
30 Ohio 4.56% 404000
31 North Dakota 4.57% 26000
32 North Carolina 4.57% 352000
33 Massachusetts 4.57% 247000
34 Arkansas 4.59% 103000
35 Wisconsin 4.60% 204000
36 Nevada 4.62% 104000
37 Iowa 4.69% 111000
38 Kentucky 4.71% 158000
39 West Virginia 4.75% 68000
40 Rhode Island 4.78% 40000
41 Kansas 4.87% 104000
42 New Hampshire 4.89% 52000
43 Montana 4.91% 39000
44 Indiana 5.04% 251000
45 Washington 5.06% 283000
46 Oregon 5.18% 166000
47 Vermont 5.31% 27000
48 Alaska 5.34% 28000
49 Colorado 5.41% 229000
50 Idaho 5.60% 70000
51 Utah 5.99% 128000
52 National 4.19% 10308000

Adults with AMI who are Uninsured 2020



 
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10.3% (over 4.7 million) of adults with a mental illness remain uninsured.
Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the U.S. continues to see a decline in Americans who are uninsured. There was a 1.9 percent reduction from last year’s dataset.

Thirty-nine states saw a reduction in Adults with AMI who are uninsured. The largest reductions were seen in Louisiana (5.3%), New York (4.7%), Iowa (4.6%) and Arkansas (4.2%).

Each of the bottom 17 states, with the exception of Louisiana, are states that have not expanded Medicaid. Louisiana, however, has had the largest reductions in the rate of uninsured adults with AMI since the state expanded Medicaid in 2016, from 20 percent of adults with AMI to 14.7%.

The rankings for this indicator used data from the 2016-2017 NSDUH. Some states, such as Arkansas, that had a reduction in uninsured adults with AMI passed Medicaid work requirements in 2018, which may lead to a large change in coverage in future reports.

The state prevalence of uninsured adults with mental illness ranges from 2.4% in Massachusetts to 22.9% in Wyoming.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 Massachusetts 2.7 32,000
02 Iowa 3.3 15,000
03 District of Columbia 3.8 5,000
04 New York 4 107,000
05 Connecticut 5.1 26,000
06 Vermont 6 6,000
07 Maryland 6.1 49,000
08 Minnesota 6.1 44,000
09 Michigan 6.2 86,000
10 Colorado 6.4 54,000
11 Wisconsin 6.4 52,000
12 Rhode Island 6.8 11,000
13 West Virginia 6.8 23,000
14 Ohio 6.9 123,000
15 Arizona 7.1 63,000
16 New Hampshire 7.1 14,000
17 Arkansas 7.2 35,000
18 Kentucky 7.2 56,000
19 New Jersey 7.2 80,000
20 Delaware 7.3 10,000
21 Pennsylvania 7.5 133,000
22 California 7.7 422,000
23 Hawaii 8 14,000
24 Oregon 8.3 65,000
25 New Mexico 8.4 23,000
26 Washington 8.8 118,000
27 Illinois 9.2 141,000
28 Indiana 9.5 102,000
29 Montana 9.7 15,000
30 Nebraska 10.2 24,000
31 Alaska 10.3 11,000
32 North Dakota 10.3 10,000
33 North Carolina 10.8 151,000
34 Nevada 10.9 48,000
35 Utah 11.3 59,000
36 South Dakota 11.5 12,000
37 Virginia 12.4 147,000
38 South Carolina 12.7 88,000
39 Missouri 13 124,000
40 Maine 14.1 28,000
41 Oklahoma 14.1 81,000
42 Kansas 14.6 61,000
43 Louisiana 14.7 97,000
44 Idaho 15.2 51,000
45 Florida 16 461,000
46 Tennessee 16 151,000
47 Alabama 16.6 123,000
48 Mississippi 18.3 77,000
49 Georgia 20.3 278,000
50 Texas 21.4 694,000
51 Wyoming 22.9 20,000

Adults with AMI who Did Not Receive Treatment 2020



 
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  • 57.2% of adults with a mental illness received no treatment.
  • Over 26 million individuals experiencing a mental health illness are going untreated.
  • The state prevalence of untreated adults with mental illness ranges from 40.7% in Vermont to 64.8% in California.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 Vermont 40.7 42,000
02 New Hampshire 44.6 89,000
03 Rhode Island 45.7 73,000
04 Iowa 47.3 214,000
05 Delaware 47.5 64,000
06 Colorado 48.7 407,000
07 Minnesota 49.5 360,000
08 Maine 49.6 99,000
09 Missouri 50.9 485,000
10 Michigan 51.1 713,000
11 Tennessee 51.4 485,000
12 Utah 51.4 269,000
13 West Virginia 51.4 177,000
14 Massachusetts 52 603,000
15 Arkansas 52.5 251,000
16 Nebraska 52.7 126,000
17 Wisconsin 52.9 427,000
18 Washington 53.1 707,000
19 Indiana 53.8 577,000
20 Ohio 54 958,000
21 Pennsylvania 54.3 960,000
22 New Mexico 54.4 148,000
23 North Carolina 54.6 754,000
24 Mississippi 54.8 230,000
25 Virginia 54.8 651,000
26 Kentucky 55 425,000
27 District of Columbia 55.4 68,000
28 North Dakota 55.6 54,000
29 South Dakota 55.6 61,000
30 Connecticut 55.7 277,000
31 Illinois 55.7 847,000
32 Maryland 55.9 446,000
33 Kansas 56.8 238,000
34 Idaho 57.1 188,000
35 South Carolina 57.4 397,000
36 Montana 58.3 92,000
37 Florida 59.3 1,705,000
38 New York 59.7 1,590,000
39 Oklahoma 59.7 344,000
40 New Jersey 59.9 663,000
41 Oregon 60.2 475,000
42 Georgia 60.9 829,000
43 Arizona 61.3 543,000
44 Texas 61.7 1,991,000
45 Louisiana 62.2 409,000
46 Alaska 62.4 66,000
47 Nevada 63.9 270,000
48 Alabama 64.3 474,000
49 Wyoming 64.3 57,000
50 Hawaii 64.6 111,000
51 California 64.8 3,533,000

Adults with AMI Reporting Unmet Need 2020



 
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Almost a quarter (22.3%) of all adults with a mental illness reported that they were not able to receive the treatment they needed. This number has not declined since 2011.

Individuals seeking treatment but still not receiving needed services face the same barriers that contribute to the number of individuals not receiving treatment:

  1. No insurance or limited coverage of services
  2. Shortfall in psychiatrists, and an overall undersized mental health workforce.
  3. Lack of available treatment types (inpatient treatment, individual therapy, intensive community services).
  4. Disconnect between primary care systems and behavioral health systems.
  5. Insufficient finances to cover costs – including, copays, uncovered treatment types, or when providers do not take insurance.

The state prevalence of adults with AMI reporting unmet treatment needs ranges from 14.3% in Alabama to 31.2% in Utah.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 Alabama 14.3 106,000
02 Hawaii 14.7 25,000
03 Iowa 18.2 82,000
04 Texas 19.2 620,000
05 Wyoming 19.2 17,000
06 Minnesota 19.4 141,000
07 Maine 19.7 39,000
08 New York 20.1 536,000
09 Louisiana 20.2 133,000
10 Ohio 20.4 363,000
11 West Virginia 20.4 70,000
12 Vermont 20.7 21,000
13 North Dakota 21.2 21,000
14 Arizona 21.3 189,000
15 Idaho 21.7 72,000
16 South Dakota 21.7 24,000
17 Delaware 21.8 29,000
18 Illinois 21.8 331,000
19 North Carolina 21.8 302,000
20 California 21.9 1,196,000
21 Mississippi 21.9 92,000
22 Alaska 22 23,000
23 Florida 22 632,000
24 Michigan 22 307,000
25 Tennessee 22 208,000
26 Wisconsin 22 178,000
27 Colorado 22.2 186,000
28 Massachusetts 22.3 262,000
29 Oklahoma 22.4 129,000
30 Georgia 22.5 309,000
31 Maryland 22.6 180,000
32 Nebraska 22.6 54,000
33 Connecticut 22.9 113,000
34 Kentucky 22.9 178,000
35 New Jersey 22.9 254,000
36 Montana 23.3 36,000
37 New Mexico 23.8 65,000
38 Rhode Island 24.3 39,000
39 District of Columbia 24.5 30,000
40 Washington 24.5 327,000
41 Pennsylvania 24.7 435,000
42 South Carolina 24.8 173,000
43 Arkansas 25 119,000
44 Missouri 25 238,000
45 Indiana 25.2 272,000
46 Kansas 25.9 109,000
47 Virginia 28.3 337,000
48 Oregon 28.5 224,000
49 Nevada 28.6 121,000
50 New Hampshire 28.8 57,000
51 Utah 31.2 163,000

Adults with Disability Who Could Not See a Doctor Due to Costs 2020



 

 
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29.4% of adults with a cognitive disability were not able to see a doctor due to costs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 11.4% of people in the United States had a cognitive disability, even when adjusted for age. 1 The percentage of people with cognitive disability ranged from 7.8 percent in some states to 19.1 percent.

A 2017 study found that compared to working-age adults without disabilities, those with disabilities are more likely to live below the federal poverty level and to use public insurance. Their average health costs were also 3-7 times higher than those without disabilities, and they were more likely to face access problems to care, including cost.

The prevalence of adults with disability who couldn’t see a MD due to cost ranges from 16.87% in Iowa to 41.03% in Texas.

 

Statistical Data

Rank Sort descending State Percentage Number
01 Iowa 16.87 37,908
02 Vermont 18.63 9,188
03 Massachusetts 20.44 110,799
04 Alaska 20.69 9,859
05 Rhode Island 20.7 20,592
06 Hawaii 20.86 19,358
07 Ohio 22.23 239,773
08 New York 22.35 315,572
09 California 22.47 647,176
10 Pennsylvania 22.97 254,064
11 Connecticut 23.06 51,647
12 New Hampshire 23.99 23,315
13 Minnesota 24.81 98,572
14 Montana 25.1 22,931
15 Delaware 25.4 24,687
16 Maryland 25.74 100,730
17 District of Columbia 25.88 14,059
18 Nebraska 26.66 33,510
19 Kentucky 26.77 145,055
20 Wisconsin 26.98 112,237
21 Washington 27.19 158,208
22 Michigan 27.29 280,450
23 West Virginia 27.54 74,517
24 North Dakota 27.67 12,131
25 Colorado 27.72 102,075
26 Oregon 28.37 103,596
27 Idaho 28.49 33,213
28 Indiana 28.78 167,315
29 Illinois 29.06 237,367
30 Maine 29.34 32,555
31 Arizona 29.84 170,006
32 Kansas 29.99 65,857
33 South Dakota 30.13 18,219
34 Nevada 30.76 77,939
35 South Carolina 30.79 147,202
36 Utah 31.19 70,771
37 Arkansas 31.42 107,117
38 New Mexico 31.51 61,938
39 Missouri 32.21 195,362
40 Tennessee 33.23 239,969
41 Alabama 33.24 191,499
42 North Carolina 33.36 290,888
43 Florida 33.37 684,912
44 Mississippi 33.97 113,045
45 Wyoming 34.35 15,974
46 Oklahoma 34.43 150,379
47 Virginia 34.48 213,282
48 New Jersey 35.07 245,583
49 Georgia 36.06 322,610
50 Louisiana 38.23 201,908
51 Texas 41.03 983,751