Mental Health America Blog https://www.mhanational.org/ en Tough News: Setting Boundaries and Caring for Your Mind in a Difficult World https://www.mhanational.org/tough-news-caring-your-mind <span>Tough News: Setting Boundaries and Caring for Your Mind in a Difficult World</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="a woman hunches over her computer reading tough news with her hands on the side of her face" src="/sites/default/files/2022-06/tough-news-web.webp" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mha-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MHA Admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/24/2022 - 14:07</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">June 24, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Katie Lee</p> <p>I recently typed the biggest headline of the day into Google, and in less than a second, 52 million news articles screamed for my attention. This was an active search, so considering all the passive media in our lives—social media, television, radio—along with streaming and traditional print news, it’s easy to see why Americans can be overwhelmed by current events.</p> <p>If you find yourself anxious, sad, angry, depressed, or any combination of emotions after reacting to recent news, first know that all of these feelings are valid. Then, take care of yourself. Each person’s needs are different, but consider the following if feeling <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="f679c744-3889-428d-b1e5-50ae00dfc965" href="/node/17624">stuck</a>:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Disconnect:</strong> Turn off the TV, close the Twitter app, and disconnect if you find yourself glued to the screen. Get <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="dbbf9d7e-3ee1-4107-80e6-d115f6157e40" href="/node/202">physically active</a> to refocus your brain, go for a walk outside, or do something with your hands, like baking, playing an instrument, or working on a DIY project around your home.</li> <li><strong>Refocus:</strong> Try meditating, yoga, or deep breathing to calm down both your body and mind. This can help shift your thinking and reduce scary thoughts about the future (anxiety).</li> <li><strong>Yell into the void (of a notebook):</strong> Write down your feelings. You don’t have to show anyone, so write whatever comes to mind, no matter how silly or angry it sounds. Putting it on paper (or a computer screen) can be a wonderful emotional release.</li> <li><strong>Help others:</strong> Volunteer with an organization that does something you support, like an animal shelter or food pantry. When feeling pessimistic, it can help to find small ways to directly help others.</li> <li><strong>Talk to another person:</strong> Connect with people if you feel alone or isolated. Call or meet up with family, friends, or even coworkers. <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="d3ee6186-a065-4e5a-8d7b-3e057dcfbae5" href="/node/2382">Find tips on making connections</a>.</li> </ul> <p>Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you are experiencing prolonged feelings of distress or depression. Talk to someone you trust, like a friend or spiritual leader, or call a <a href="https://screening.mhanational.org/content/need-talk-someone-warmlines/?layout=actions_ah_test">warmline</a> to discuss your mental health concerns with a trained responder. Find out how to <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1141b291-78dd-4829-98b2-372ad35cdfbd" href="/node/175">find professional help</a>.</p> <p>If you are in crisis, you can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1- 800-273-8255 (1-888-628-9454 para español) to talk to a trained listener or you can reach Crisis Text Line (in English or en español) by messaging “MHA” to 741-741.</p> <p>The best defense to upsetting news is protecting your mind and being kind to yourself.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/tough-news-caring-your-mind" data-a2a-title="Tough News: Setting Boundaries and Caring for Your Mind in a Difficult World"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Fri, 24 Jun 2022 18:07:52 +0000 MHA Admin 21715 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/tough-news-caring-your-mind#comments Top 10 takeaways from MHA’s Annual Conference https://www.mhanational.org/blog/top-10-takeaways-mhas-annual-conference <span>Top 10 takeaways from MHA’s Annual Conference</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Jennifer Bright stands between MHA CEO Schroeder Stribling and man" src="/sites/default/files/2022-06/conference-takeaways.png" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mha-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MHA Admin</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/15/2022 - 09:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">June 15, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Jennifer Bright</p> <p>Last week’s 2022 MHA Annual Conference,&nbsp;<em>Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope</em>, convened, both in person and virtually, thousands of mental health advocates, clinicians, and crusaders with a unified goal of sharing ideas to improve mental health for all. Personally, it was a special event that marked the beginning of my tenure as MHA Board Chair, an honor and responsibility I am energized to embrace.</p> <p>With so many incredible sessions led by inspirational and knowledgeable speakers, every attendee could give you a list of their most memorable moments. For me, these were my top 10 favorite takeaways from yet another amazing MHA conference.</p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong>Connecting people’s brains and hearts is the key to good legislation and policy</strong>. Thank you to Utah State Sen. Steve Eliason for his perspective on this as an elected leader.</li> </ol> <ol start="9"> <li>New York Times bestselling author&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://basseyikpi.com/" href="https://basseyikpi.com/">Bassey Ikpi</a>&nbsp;reminded us that&nbsp;<strong>recognizing the good in oneself equals spirituality</strong>. MHA President and CEO Schroeder Stribling announced an MHA endeavor over the next few years to study the spirit-mind link and how it can improve mental well-being.</li> </ol> <ol start="8"> <li><strong>From pain comes greatness</strong>. Our speakers offered living proof of this in art and music (multi-platinum pop artist Andy Grammer), poetry and writing (Bassey Ikpi), and athleticism (10-time world champion swimmer Allison Schmitt).</li> </ol> <ol start="7"> <li><strong>Just keep moving</strong>.&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://www.mhanational.org/mental-health-america-announces-2022-award-winners#:~:text=MHA's%20mPower%20Award%20celebrates%20the,Bates%20College%20in%20Lewiston%2C%20Maine." href="https://www.mhanational.org/mental-health-america-announces-2022-award-winners#:~:text=MHA's%20mPower%20Award%20celebrates%20the,Bates%20College%20in%20Lewiston%2C%20Maine.">MHA’s 2022 mPower award</a>&nbsp;recipient Sam Gerry’s story echoed this sentiment from Martin Luther King Jr. Gerry, a 20-year-old college student, co-founded&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://www.facebook.com/KickItFAC/" href="https://www.facebook.com/KickItFAC/">Kick It for a Cause, Inc.</a>, a charity kickball tournament-turned-nonprofit organization supporting suicide prevention.</li> </ol> <ol start="6"> <li><strong>Think out of the box</strong>. Look for uncommon and unexpected solutions. Shoutout to&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://www.theconfessproject.com/" href="https://www.theconfessproject.com/">The Confess Project</a>&nbsp;for linking mental health and barbers to reach Black men.</li> </ol> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>We are all in this together</strong>&nbsp;— mental health affects everyone and is our call for allyship, coalition, and radical collaboration.</li> </ol> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Change happens in communities</strong>&nbsp;— first and always.</li> </ol> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>The struggle is real&nbsp;<em>and</em>&nbsp;there is hope. Youth are this movement’s future</strong>. It’s proof that MHA’s strategic focus on NextGen Prevention strategic plan is both visionary and impact focused.</li> </ol> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Be authentic. Love yourself as you are.</strong>&nbsp;Andy Grammer beautifully put this in&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIo5tB2sPyk" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIo5tB2sPyk">song</a>, and so many presenters at this conference brilliantly put this into words.</li> </ol> <ol> <li><strong>Your voice is your superpower: USE IT.</strong>Tell your story, share your learning from the conference, ask questions, and demand change.</li> </ol> <p>If you missed this year’s conference, I encourage you to attend next year and make your own list of takeaways to share with your community.</p> <p><i data-stringify-type="italic"><a data-remove-tab-index="true" data-sk="tooltip_parent" data-stringify-link="https://www.mhanational.org/board-directors/jennifer-l-bright-mpa" delay="150" href="https://www.mhanational.org/board-directors/jennifer-l-bright-mpa" rel="noopener noreferrer" tabindex="-1" target="_blank">Jennifer Bright</a></i><i data-stringify-type="italic">&nbsp;is MHA Board Chair and president of Momentum Health Strategies.</i></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/top-10-takeaways-mhas-annual-conference" data-a2a-title="Top 10 takeaways from MHA’s Annual Conference"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:55:13 +0000 MHA Admin 21707 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/top-10-takeaways-mhas-annual-conference#comments Day Three At Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-three-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope <span>Day Three At Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Allison Schmitt on stage with Jillian Hughes at 2022 Conference" src="/sites/default/files/2022-06/_MG_3601.jpg" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/13/2022 - 22:24</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">June 12, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Allison Schmitt, 10-time world champion swimming medalist, sat down with MHA’s EVP of Communications, Jillian Hughes, to discuss living with depression and her decision to speak out publicly about it after her cousin April died by suicide.</strong> “I was scared to say anything,” Schmitt recalled, “I remember the first time I spoke to media about it. I wasn’t able to finish…it made me feel bare. I didn’t have that blanket over me to protect myself, but it was also a weight off.”</p> <p>She said she continues to speak about it now because, “if there’s someone new in the room I can relate to and help, that is my mission.”</p> <p>Swimming, she said, helped her through it: "I can proudly say sports saved my life. And I credit that for why I'm here."</p> <p>But she also feels that there needs to be a lot more support available: “It feels like America has a hole. And a movement to talk about it is beginning to change it, but we need a lot more resources.”</p> <h2>Annual Conference Speakers Highlight Need for Strategic Leadership</h2> <p><strong>Congressman Jamie Raskin, U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 8th Congressional District, Kana Enomoto, Director of Brain Health for McKinsey Health Institute, Utah State Rep. Steve Eliason, John Draper, EVP at Vibrant Emotional Health spoke about strategic leadership during crisis times. </strong>“The innovations that are most important are going to be along prevention lines,” Draper said. “My wish for you is to be looking in your home and your community, and take care of yourselves and others. Crisis care starts at home,” he added.&nbsp;</p> <p>“Connecting people's brains and hearts is critical to passing good legislation,” said Eliason, “Find where you can make a difference and go out and make your mark.”</p> <p><strong>Natasha De Veauuse Brown of the GSU School of Public Health and Dontay Williams and Lorenzo Lewis of The Confess Project led a breakout session</strong> on training Black barbers to be mental health advocates for their clients and communities. “We are turning barbershops into the new reimagined health centers of America,” said Lewis. “This is the place where Black men can feel comfortable, supported, not judged,” Brown added.</p> <p><br /> <strong>Debbie Plotnick, MHA’s EVP of State and Federal Advocacy, and Elliot Pinsly of the Behavioral Health Foundation co-led a breakout session</strong> on deflection versus diversion in community care. “A deflection program is only as good as the options available for care,” said Pinsly, “...at the end of the day it’s got to be available right there when they need it.”</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-three-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope" data-a2a-title="Day Three At Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Tue, 14 Jun 2022 02:24:48 +0000 jhughes 21705 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-three-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope#comments Day Two at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-two-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope <span>Day Two at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Kelly Davis and four of MHA&#039;s young mental health leaders" src="/sites/default/files/2022-06/MHA-Conference-Day-Two.webp" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/10/2022 - 22:53</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">June 11, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Bassey Ikpi, New York Times bestselling author of “I’m Telling The Truth But I’m Lying,” discussed writing her book and the moment she was diagnosed with bipolar II disorder.</strong> “So many of the books I’ve read about mental illness, and specifically Black mental illness, were statistic-based…It didn’t feel like anything and I wanted people to feel it,” she said.&nbsp;</p> <p>“One of the things I had the most difficult time with was not knowing who I was,” she said of her experience after being diagnosed. She was suddenly unsure of her true personality.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ikpi also recognized and thanked the mental health professionals and advocates in attendance: “I wanted to be here because of the role mental health professionals have played in my life. It is because of them that I am here…You are saving so many lives in ways that I hope you understand…what you do has saved me more times than I can count.”</p> <p><strong>Four of MHA's Young Mental Health Leaders, Breanna Kennedy, Mahmoud Khedr, Melanie Zhou, and Catherine Delgado took the stage for a conversation with AVP of Peer and Youth Advocacy, Kelly Davis.</strong> The young leaders spoke about the experience of being told by adults that as a young person, your problems are small. “Kids just want to be listened to,” said Breanna Kennedy.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Mahmoud Khedr emphasized the need for finding out why young people are experiencing unprecedented anxiety and called for systemic change. "If we're not looking at the underlying causes and what is causing that stress, than we're going to fail them,” he said.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kelly Davis presented MHA’s 2022 mPower award to Sam Gerry.</strong> The mPower award celebrates the life and work of a teen or young adult who has spoken out about mental health issues to educate his or her peers and fight stigma. Sam is a 20-year-old rising junior at Bates College and the co-founder of Kick It for a Cause, Inc., a charity kickball tournament-turned-nonprofit organization supporting suicide prevention.</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 George Goodman Brudney and Ruth P. Brudney Social Work Award was presented to Stacey Freedenthal, PhD, LCSW.</strong> The award recognizes significant contributions made to the care and treatment of people living with mental illnesses by practicing professionals in the field of social work. Freedenthal accepted the award in person and spoke about how for decades she hid her own depression and suicidal ideation. ”I was afraid the stigma of mental illness would harm my career as a mental health professional,” she said. Freedenthal said that ultimately she chose to share her lived experience to help people who still must hide their mental illness and who still have a lot to lose.</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 Richard Van Horn Innovation in Programming Award was presented to the Mental Health Association in New Jersey for the New Jersey Mental Health Players program.</strong> The award recognizes the continuing innovation and creativity of an MHA affiliate in program development and implementation. Lynette Sheard accepted the award in person and told the audience: “Let’s inspire creativity. Let’s be brave. Let’s fight in the open. Let’s stay well…don’t set yourself on fire to keep other people warm, let self-care be your superpower.”&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 Betty Humphrey Equity Champion Award was presented to Open Paths Counseling Center.</strong> The award is given to an individual or organization for demonstrating an ongoing commitment to the fight for diversity, equity, and inclusion. Sierra Smith accepted the award on behalf of Open Paths Counseling Center, which has been at the forefront of serving low-income clients and communities in Los Angeles for over 40 years. In her acceptance speech, Sierra recalled that when she started at Open Paths in 2016, the therapists that the center was training came primarily from Los Angeles’ more affluent communities. She noticed a disconnect. “We had to pivot,” she said, and she led the shift toward bringing in clinicians who were representative of the communities that the center served.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 Joseph de Raismes III Policy Award was presented to Cynthia Wainscott. </strong>The award honors an individual who – like Raismes – makes outstanding contributions to furthering mental health policy. In her acceptance speech, Wainscott spoke about her inspiration to continue being a mental health advocate. She said her inspiration comes from two things: an impactful day volunteering at Central State Hospital in Georgia and her experience with intergenerational family mental illness.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 Media Awards were presented to journalists Lindsay Holmes and Catherine Pearson for their article, “If You Have A Mood Disorder, You May Now Be Eligible For A COVID Booster”; to the WBIR Newsroom and Production Team for WBIR’s Mental Health Monday; and to Well Beings &amp; Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness.</strong></p> <p>Lindsay Holmes accepted the award virtually noting that, "The pandemic has only underscored the fact that mental health is health."</p> <p>Emily Wakefield and Katie Inman accepted for WBIR. "It's not about how pretty our shots were or how well-crafted our research, it's about making a difference in our community,” said Wakefield.&nbsp;</p> <p>Christopher Ewers was part of the group accepting for Well Beings and Hiding in Plain Sight. "I don't think there's a single human being on the planet who is not directly or indirectly affected by mental health challenges...it is time we start talking about it,” he said.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MHA VP of Partnerships and Community Outreach Dr. America Paredes led a breakout session</strong> on language, culture, and mental health literacy. “There’s a lack of culturally and linguistically relevant, responsive providers and treatment options,” she said, “Language is not the main issue. It’s one of the issues. At the end of the day, it’s about seeking out people who understand your culture.”</p> <p><strong>Rita Sitney of the U.S. Army led a breakout session </strong>on music as a coping strategy to reduce stress during COVID-19. “If you’re listening to the right music, it can help you get to a neutral, calm state where your well-being improves,” she said, “We saw yesterday how music has an impact. What Andy Grammer did was take his emotions and thoughts and use them to communicate and connect with people around him.”</p> <p><strong>Wendell Potter of the Center for Health and Democracy co-led a breakout session </strong>on breaking down the insurance barrier to equitable mental health care. “You have to become a squeaky wheel,” he said, “You have to take your case to someone who can be an advocate for you – a doctor, lawyer, or member of the media.”</p> <p><strong>Donta Gee of NAMI co-led a breakout session</strong> on the pandemic and poetry. “When we share in these spaces, I can say one, you’re not alone, and I can leave knowing I’m not alone,” she said.</p> <p><strong>Pierluigi Mancini, MHA Board Chair-elect and President of the Multicultural Development Institute, Inc. led a breakout session</strong> on Latino Mental Health. “Equality only works when everyone starts in the same place,” he said.&nbsp;</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-two-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope" data-a2a-title="Day Two at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Sat, 11 Jun 2022 02:53:12 +0000 jhughes 21704 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-two-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope#comments Day One at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-one-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope <span>Day One at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Schroeder Stribling at a podium" src="/sites/default/files/2022-06/MHA-Annual-Conference.webp" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/09/2022 - 23:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">June 10, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>MHA President &amp; CEO, Schroeder Stribling announced the focus of MHA’s 2022-2025 strategic plan: “Next Gen Prevention.” </strong>Stribling took the stage to welcome 400+ in-person attendees and over 8,000 virtual attendees with a call to action.&nbsp;</p> <p>“We are here united in a common purpose as providers, advocates, allies, people with lived experience, and family members. We are here as a powerful coalition with reach and with impact. And we have a public mental health crisis on our hands. This is our signal. This is our call to action. And it’s a call we’re ready to answer.”</p> <p>She previewed the organization’s three-year strategic plan centering on “Next Gen Prevention.” She said MHA would focus on the current mental health crisis of our youth while continuing to emphasize screening, early identification, and early intervention.</p> <p><strong>Multi-platinum Pop Artist Andy Grammer encouraged authenticity, performed “Love Myself,” and “Don’t Give Up On Me.”</strong> In one of his first-ever large speaking engagements, Andy Grammer spoke about starting to identify as someone who needed help during the COVID-19 pandemic. He recalled a moment when he was told that his music was number one in the world on Spotify for music tagged as “happy,” but said he didn’t feel that way internally. “Happiest guy on Spotify, super depressed,” he said. In order to get through it, he said he had to write himself a love song and he performed his track, “Love Myself” for the audience. He also spoke of the power of being authentic and said by doing the work involved with authenticity, “it takes me so much further than where I’ve imagined I’m supposed to be.” He closed by saying, “I didn’t think a couple years ago that I was supposed to be here, but I super am, so thank you for having me.”&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MHA’s 2022 Clifford W. Beers Award was presented to Sally Zinman. </strong>The Clifford W. Beers Award is MHA’s highest honor. Created in 1976, it has been presented annually to a consumer of mental health and/or substance abuse services who best reflects the example set by Beers in his efforts to improve conditions for, and attitudes toward, people with mental illnesses. Sally Zinman has been a pioneer of the mental health peer movement since the mid 1970’s. Sally's commitment to the rights of people with mental health challenges came from her own horrendous experience in the mental health system. Sally accepted the award virtually saying it was for all those working in the peer movement, “I believe this award is for them because I carry them in my heart and in all my actions and words.”</p> <p><strong>Jeanne Manchin Wong and Lori Karabinchak from Middlesex County, New Jersey’s<a href="https://twitter.com/MiddlesexCntyNJ"> </a>Office of Health Services led a breakout session</strong> discussing understanding and overcoming compassion fatigue. “Workaholism is not a badge of honor,” Jeanne Manchin Wong said.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Rachel Harlich, LMSW led a breakout session</strong> about harnessing your body’s wisdom and power for deep self-care. “If stress and emotion are a bodily experience, so are healing and wellness,” she noted.</p> <p><strong>Cecilia McGough, Shira Agam, Emeka Chima, Laura Kordowski and Dominique shared their experiences as students living with psychosis.</strong> “Even though severe illness seems so dark in the media, it is not. We are full of light,” said Dominique as she shared her story.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-one-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope" data-a2a-title="Day One at Mental Health America’s 2022 Annual Conference, Forward Together: Recovery, Healing, Hope"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=21703&amp;2=comment_node_blog_post&amp;3=comment_node_blog_post" token="3_L2oPuCYdc3XP4dLQT-it4D_I1GqRNCbTR6EIzfAgw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 10 Jun 2022 03:41:27 +0000 jhughes 21703 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/day-one-mental-health-americas-2022-annual-conference-forward-together-recovery-healing-hope#comments We Must Take Care of Ourselves and the Youth This Mental Health Month https://www.mhanational.org/blog/we-must-take-care-ourselves-and-youth-mental-health-month <span>We Must Take Care of Ourselves and the Youth This Mental Health Month</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="A youth is being hugged by an adult while two other adults look on smiling" src="/sites/default/files/2022-05/care-ourselves-youth.png" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mha-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MHA Admin</span></span> <span>Mon, 05/23/2022 - 11:04</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">May 23, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Schroeder Stribling, President and CEO of Mental Health America</p> <p>To be a young person today is to worry. While we all experienced the challenges of our teen years, today’s generation of young people face a set of unique challenges. Social media pressures. Racial unrest. Climate change. Threats to basic rights. Global instability. And the list goes on. Add to that a once-in-a-generation pandemic, and the youth mental health crisis that was a kindling fire a decade ago has become a five-alarm blaze.</p> <p>Our youth are desperately in need of help, and it is time we answer the call. In&nbsp;<a href="https://mhanational.org/mental-health-and-covid-19-two-years-after-pandemic">data released this month</a>, a record 5.4 million people in 2021 took a mental health screening using Mental Health America’s (MHA) Online Screening Program – almost half of them were youth aged 11-17. In our analysis, we saw rates of people experiencing suicidal ideation reach record levels, with particularly high numbers among LGBTQ+ youth and youth of color.</p> <p>So, what can we do?</p> <p>At MHA, we are focused on next-generation prevention – guarding against the emergence of mental health conditions and mitigating the impact for those who are currently struggling. That includes:</p> <ul> <li>Ensuring the conditions for mental well-being, such as housing food and economic security.</li> <li>Ensuring timely access to culturally responsive mental health services, without financial or other barriers.</li> <li>Providing education on the basics of mental health, resilience, and recovery.</li> <li>Responding promptly, especially in emergency situations, with trained peers and clinicians.</li> <li>Addressing the addiction crisis.</li> <li>Prioritizing equity and ensuring inclusion.</li> <li>Leading with the voices of lived experience.</li> </ul> <p>This is what next generation prevention looks like. We address some of these concepts in our 2022 Mental Health Month Toolkit,&nbsp;<a href="https://mhanational.org/mental-health-month"><em>Back to Basics</em></a>. Find, in both English and Spanish:</p> <ul> <li>How to maintain good mental health,</li> <li>How to recognize when you need help with mental health,</li> <li>What to do when you need help with your mental health, and</li> <li>Terms to know.</li> </ul> <p>Our toolkit also includes ways to involve your workplace, community, school, or organization with posters, drop-in articles, and sample social media posts and graphics.</p> <p>In addition, learn more about the&nbsp;<a href="https://mhanational.org/position-statements/childrens-issues">youth mental health</a>&nbsp;crisis and how MHA works to&nbsp;<a href="https://mhanational.org/youngleaders/programs-reports">elevate the voices of our young people</a>&nbsp;through the Young Mental Health Leaders Council and the Collegiate Mental Health Innovation Council.</p> <p>Mental health is health, and just as it is important to build a strong foundation of knowledge about our physical health, the same is true of mental health. This Mental Health Month, I encourage you to step back inside the metaphorical classroom and get Back to Basics, as we work together for better mental health for all youth.</p> <p>I also encourage you to check in with friends and family this month – offer to listen, validate feelings, and aid in accessing help if needed. While we are dealing with serious, and sometimes complicated topics, it is important to support each other remember that mental well-being and healing are within reach.</p> <p><em>Mental Health American is a member of the <a href="https://nationalhealthcouncil.org/">National Health Council</a>. This blog was originally <a href="https://nationalhealthcouncil.org/blog/we-must-take-care-of-ourselves-and-the-youth-this-mental-health-month/">published</a> on the NHC website.</em></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/we-must-take-care-ourselves-and-youth-mental-health-month" data-a2a-title="We Must Take Care of Ourselves and the Youth This Mental Health Month"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Mon, 23 May 2022 15:04:05 +0000 MHA Admin 21683 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/we-must-take-care-ourselves-and-youth-mental-health-month#comments 6 tips to get back to basics for mental health month https://www.mhanational.org/blog/6-tips-get-back-basics-mental-health-month <span>6 tips to get back to basics for mental health month</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="person wearing headphones while holding phone and looking to the side in a subway station" src="/sites/default/files/2022-05/6-tips-mental-health-month.jpg" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mha-admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MHA Admin</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/11/2022 - 12:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">May 11, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>By Danielle Fritze</em></p> <p>This Mental Health Month, we’re going back to basics. After two years existing in a pandemic, many people are realizing that stress, isolation, and uncertainty have taken a toll on their well-being.&nbsp;This May, we aim to provide foundational knowledge about mental health and mental health conditions for people who might be experiencing symptoms for the first time. The basics can also serve as a good refresher for everyone – while 1 in 5 of us will meet the requirements for a diagnosable mental health condition in a given year, 5 in 5 of us have mental health.</p> <p>Here are a few&nbsp;<strong>basics</strong>&nbsp;to start with:</p> <h2><strong>B</strong>e Self-Aware</h2> <p>Not everyone experiences the signs and symptoms of mental health conditions in the same way. It is important to have a sense of how you feel when your mental health is in a good place so you can notice early if things start to change. Take a moment to think about a time when you felt good about your life. What kinds of friendships did you have? What kind of work were you doing? What hobbies did you enjoy? What did your eating, exercise, and sleep routines look like?</p> <h2><strong>A</strong>ct if You Need Help</h2> <p>We all have tough days and weeks, and struggling with your mental health doesn't automatically mean you have a mental health condition. However, if you experience changes in your thinking and emotions that seriously hurt your ability to do the things you want to do, especially over a long period of weeks or months, then it is time to get help.</p> <h2><strong>S</strong>creen for Mental Health Conditions</h2> <p>A screen is a quick, free, and confidential way to determine if you might be experiencing signs of a mental health condition. A screening only takes a few minutes, and after you are finished you will be given information about the next steps you should take based on the results. A screening is not a diagnosis, but it can be a helpful tool for starting a conversation with your doctor or a loved one about your mental health. Visit&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools/" href="https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools/">mhascreening.org</a>&nbsp;to get started.</p> <h2><strong>I</strong>nform Yourself</h2> <p>Mental health deserves your attention just as much as your physical health does. Learning about the factors that affect mental health and the warning signs of different mental health conditions can help you catch problems early and take action. It’s also important to be up to speed about different types of treatment options as you seek help to improve your well-being.</p> <h2><strong>C</strong>oping Skills are Key</h2> <p>Coping skills are ways to help you deal with difficult feelings. It’s important to figure out which coping skills work best for you and practice them often so that you're better able to handle tough times when they happen. Not sure where to start? MHA can help. Learn about <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="ecf3d520-8613-42b6-8c8f-ba5a94a6ece0" href="/node/19427">building your coping toolbox</a>.</p> <h2><strong>S</strong>ay Something</h2> <p>If your mental health is suffering, you may feel alone, but you are&nbsp;<em>not</em>&nbsp;alone.. Chances are that someone you know has also had a mental health concern at some point. Talking about your mental health struggles to someone you trust can be a great relief and helps you build a support system.&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="https://mhanational.org/time-talk-tips-talking-about-your-mental-health" href="https://mhanational.org/time-talk-tips-talking-about-your-mental-health">Check out these tips for starting a conversation</a>.</p> <h3 style="padding-top:12px;">Extra Tip: Check Out Our Mental Health Month Toolkit</h3> <p>Learn more about mental health by downloading our&nbsp;<a data-mce-href="http://www.mhanational.org/may." href="https://mhanational.org/mental-health-month">Back to Basics toolkit</a>&nbsp;during Mental Health Month.</p> <p><em>Danielle Fritze is the&nbsp;Vice President of Public Education and Design at Mental Health America.</em></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/6-tips-get-back-basics-mental-health-month" data-a2a-title="6 tips to get back to basics for mental health month"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Wed, 11 May 2022 16:41:02 +0000 MHA Admin 21661 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/6-tips-get-back-basics-mental-health-month#comments A pioneer of equitable mental health: Honoring Bebe Moore Campbell https://www.mhanational.org/blog/pioneer-equitable-mental-health-honoring-bebe-moore-campbell <span>A pioneer of equitable mental health: Honoring Bebe Moore Campbell</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Photo of Bebe Moore Campbell" src="/sites/default/files/2022-05/Photo%20of%20Bebe%20Moore%20Campbell.jpg" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/03/2022 - 15:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">May 04, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p style="margin-bottom:11px"><em>By Allissa Torres</em></p> <p>We must never forget the pioneers who laid the foundation for today’s mental health culture. One of those trailblazers was Bebe Moore Campbell, someone who saw injustice and turned it into action. She was a truth-teller, advocate, mother, author, daughter, pioneer, teacher, and friend. Most importantly, though, Bebe was a fighter. She fought for equitable mental health care, especially for Black and African American communities. She fought to ensure that neither her loved ones nor others’ loved ones went without the support they deserved. She was intentional. She never once shied away from the truth: People deserve to thrive, even when they’re sick, even when their brains are fighting against them.</p> <p>And, thanks to former Congressman Rep. Albert Wynn and networks of friends, on June 2, 2008, a bipartisan and bicameral Congress formally recognized July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. The month brings awareness to the experiences and the unique struggles of underrepresented communities interfacing with the mental health system in the U.S. Bebe’s legacy continues to inspire a national movement for parity, inclusion, and navigating the mental health needs of people of color away from the criminal justice system and into a health justice ecosystem grounded in treatment, empathy, and cultural humility.</p> <p>Bebe used storytelling as her advocacy, ensuring that narratives that often go unheard were at the forefront of her work. A best-selling author of several books, including “Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine,” “Singing in the Comeback Choir,” “What You Owe Me,” and “Brothers and Sisters,” Bebe received many prestigious honors for her works that so-often focused on racism and mental health. Beyond the written word, she used her voice as an NPR commentator to speak on the stigma of mental health and the intersections of being a Black woman in America.</p> <p>She also took her advocacy to the community, co-founding in 2003 the National Alliance on Mental Illness Inglewood, which later became NAMI Urban Los Angeles, a countywide chapter providing multicultural and multilingual education and resources to the Black, Latino, and Korean communities that reside within the County of Los Angeles, including those seeking support as families, peers, and individuals with lived experience.</p> <p>Bebe Moore Campbell fought tirelessly for equitable mental health care until she passed away in 2006 at 56 — an age that allowed her to make an indelible mark on this world and illuminate inspired change and encouraging unwavering faith. There is no doubt the national conversation on the mental health needs of communities that have been traditionally marginalized would not be what it is without her dedication and steadfast courage to challenge systems of care. We at Mental Health America are grateful for her tireless advocacy and fighting spirit that has undoubtedly led countless individuals on the path toward healing, hope, and mental well-being.</p> <p><em>Allissa Torres is director of mental health equity at Mental Health America.</em></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/pioneer-equitable-mental-health-honoring-bebe-moore-campbell" data-a2a-title="A pioneer of equitable mental health: Honoring Bebe Moore Campbell"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-simplenews-term field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="/newsletter/newsletter" hreflang="en">Newsletter</a></div> <section> </section> Tue, 03 May 2022 19:44:21 +0000 jhughes 21640 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/pioneer-equitable-mental-health-honoring-bebe-moore-campbell#comments Study shows new opportunity to prevent postpartum depression https://www.mhanational.org/blog/study-shows-new-opportunity-prevent-postpartum-depression <span>Study shows new opportunity to prevent postpartum depression</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Image of mother and new baby" src="/sites/default/files/2022-04/pexels-sarah-chai-7282750.jpg" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Tue, 04/26/2022 - 12:09</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">April 26, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p style="margin-bottom:11px">By Nathaniel Z. Counts, J.D.</p> <p>In 2019, a <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2724194">major study</a> found that getting the right care can make pregnant individuals less likely to develop postpartum depression. The government now recommends that medical providers offer services, such as <a href="https://www.mothersandbabiesprogram.org/providers/">Mothers and Babies</a>, to address early warning signs, and most types of health insurance now cover them. The new coverage could be game-changing for families in the U.S. – postpartum depression has huge consequences for birthing individuals and their children, and the chance to reduce the burden could help millions.</p> <p>Unfortunately, there is still a long road ahead before people can actually access these prevention services. Changing medical practice is expensive, and most providers weren’t trained on how to do prevention. Thus, providers will need financial support to enhance the kinds of care they provide.</p> <p>In a <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2791528">study recently published in JAMA Network Open</a>, Mental Health America (MHA) and its research partners examined one way of helping providers get financial support to pay for prevention. We tested how much Medicaid would pay if it shared with providers half of the savings it expects over five years from preventing postpartum depression. In this scenario, providers would have to show that they reduced the total number of postpartum depression cases. We found that, under the right conditions, a payment approach like this could offer hundreds of dollars per person and add up to quite a lot – enough to provide strong financial support for preventing postpartum depression.</p> <p>However, a few Medicaid-related issues stand in the way. First, people frequently change their insurance coverage, such as switching between Medicaid plans. When people switch, the insurance plan that paid upfront for prevention doesn’t get to enjoy all of the savings. Similarly, not all states have made sure that people can stay consistently covered on Medicaid. These issues make prevention harder to pay for because there is less savings for the Medicaid insurer to share with providers.</p> <p>As states and the federal government come up with plans to pay for mental health and substance use care in new ways, MHA is working to tackle Medicaid-related matters and make postpartum preventive care part of the future. With our approach, providers could get the financial support they need to provide prevention services, and millions of pregnant individuals in the U.S. would get desperately needed better support.</p> <p><em>Nathaniel Z. Counts, J.D., is senior vice president of behavioral health innovation at Mental Health America.</em></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/study-shows-new-opportunity-prevent-postpartum-depression" data-a2a-title="Study shows new opportunity to prevent postpartum depression"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Tue, 26 Apr 2022 16:09:20 +0000 jhughes 21607 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/study-shows-new-opportunity-prevent-postpartum-depression#comments The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Issued a Devastating Mental Health Ruling: Here's Why It Matters https://www.mhanational.org/blog/ninth-circuit-court-appeals-issued-devastating-mental-health-ruling-heres-why-it-matters <span>The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Issued a Devastating Mental Health Ruling: Here&#039;s Why It Matters</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-post-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco, California" src="/sites/default/files/2022-03/10753814666_3c66ae56b2_o.jpg" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/jhughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jhughes</span></span> <span>Thu, 03/24/2022 - 15:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-post-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item">March 25, 2022 </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>Image: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco, California. (Source: Ken Lund, https://flic.kr/p/hoh1wJ; CC BY-SA 2.0, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)</em></p> <p><em>By Jillian Hughes, Executive Vice President of Communications at Mental Health America</em></p> <p>If you’ve ever tried to get mental health care paid for by your health insurance plan, you know it is a miserable experience from beginning to end – you cannot find an in-network provider, and if you do, the insurance company makes it difficult to continue treatment, denying coverage or discharging you from care the minute you are not suicidal.&nbsp;</p> <p>I have personal experience fighting this battle and know too well the toll it takes, so I am particularly furious with the Ninth Circuit’s decision in <em>Wit v. United Behavioral Healthcare (UBH)</em>, issued this week. The court gave UBH a free pass to deny care to people with mental health conditions, sending them and their families into desperation and despair.</p> <p>It took me over 10 years from the time I first thought I needed a therapist to actually see one. This was for a whole host of reasons – including being unfamiliar with how to navigate my own insurance, and then struggling to find someone in-network that wouldn’t break the bank. Then, I finally found the holy grail – an in-network therapist close to home that I clicked with.</p> <p>Not long into treatment, my therapist started getting regular phone calls from my insurer, United Behavioral Healthcare, asking why I still needed therapy because they did not want to pay anymore. I was confused and upset. An insurance company wouldn’t call my nephrologist and say, “prove to us she still needs weekly dialysis appointments, we don’t want to pay for them.” So why were they calling my therapist? My therapist explained that insurance companies routinely deny coverage or discharge clients in inpatient and outpatient settings once they are not acutely ill.</p> <p>The mental health legal community has been working for decades to require insurers to treat mental health the same as physical health and stop arbitrarily denials of inpatient or outpatient mental health care without any medical basis. In 2019, a district court found that United Behavioral Healthcare developed its care guidelines solely for the purpose of denying care. In a 100-page detailed opinion, the court said United’s guidelines were inconsistent with and not based on any generally-accepted medical standards. UBH was required to re-process the unfair coverage decisions.</p> <p>But this week, a three-judge appellate court dealt a crushing blow to this work– they overturned the 2019 decision and gave insurers a free pass to make up guidelines once again. Adding insult to injury, this came in the form of a 7-page <em>unpublished</em> decision.</p> <p>Decisions like this remind us that discrimination is ongoing and structural. What could be a greater example of stigma than denying fundamental rights in an unpublished short opinion? The court was clearly saying that the right to fair mental health treatment is so unimportant, it can be dismissed out of hand and there is no need for anyone to study or read the opinion. It’s insulting to the 1 in 5 people in this country who live with a mental illness.</p> <p><a>The court distorted the plaintiffs’ claims and characterized them as a request that UBH provide <em>all</em> generally accepted care. The plaintiffs were not arguing that they had to provide all services that were consistent with generally accepted care. They were arguing that when an insurer claims to be providing a benefit, such as intensive outpatient care, nutrition counseling, residential, and inpatient care, they must use generally accepted standards in deciding whether and how much of that care you receive.</a></p> <p>So what does this decision and the distorted legal reasoning mean, practically speaking? It means that if an insurance plan says it covers residential or inpatient care, that does not mean you get to stay as long as medical professionals under generally-accepted guidelines say you should stay. You can be discharged after a few days and given a follow-up appointment for a month from now and the insurer has the right to create a standard that drives up their profits. If you need intensive outpatient care to avoid hospitalization or after an inpatient stay, it can be denied or prematurely cut off. Any time that the insurer wants to make more money, they can develop a standard to provide less care.</p> <p>United Healthcare made $17 billion in profits in 2021 and with decisions like this one, they stand to make much more in the future. We can only hope that the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is embarrassed by the judges that so cavalierly left Americans with mental illness and substance use disorders helpless against insurance companies and grants en banc review. Just as they have with other civil rights battles, the courts have an important role to play and can overturn prior misguided decisions based on the reality of what is happening to people who are subjected to discrimination.</p> <p>Congress has a role to play as well, they need to add teeth to parity laws and allow monetary penalties for violations.&nbsp;It’s time for courts and policymakers to address the structural discrimination that denies life-saving mental health and substance use care.</p> <p><em>Mary Giliberti, J.D., Chief Policy Officer at Mental Health America, contributed to this blog.</em></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://www.mhanational.org/blog/ninth-circuit-court-appeals-issued-devastating-mental-health-ruling-heres-why-it-matters" data-a2a-title="The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Issued a Devastating Mental Health Ruling: Here&#039;s Why It Matters"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"></a></span><section> </section> Thu, 24 Mar 2022 19:34:41 +0000 jhughes 21558 at https://www.mhanational.org https://www.mhanational.org/blog/ninth-circuit-court-appeals-issued-devastating-mental-health-ruling-heres-why-it-matters#comments